Friday, May 27, 2011

Memorial Day contest - free e-book giveaway

Just in time for Memorial Day comes the release of The Chevron Collection, a beautiful e-book that explores "different ways to make a Chevron shape -- with lace, with cables, and with placed increases and decreases that make the fabric itself shaped with chevrons." Miriam L. Felton designed the six beautiful patterns that come in this book -- and she's graciously offered me a free copy of this e-book to give to one lucky winner!


My favorite pattern in the collection is the Rivel Cardigan, which comes in sizes up to 56 inches. Miriam's design includes fascinating shaping. Unlike virtually every other pattern, it is not symmetrical from front to back. The front pieces include additional room for the bust but are narrower through the hips, and the back piece is narrower through the upper back and waist and wider to accommodate the derriere. This girl is singing my song! Here's what she has to say about it: "With front and back pieces shaped to fit a woman’s figure, this high-waisted, feminine cardigan makes a great addition to any wardrobe. Knit it in a smooth wool for a more refined style, or a tweedy yarn for a more relaxed feel."


The e-book also features the Furrows Cowl, Furrows Shawl, Gully Socks, Rill Scarf, and Tributary Gloves, all gorgeous designs knitted in luxurious gray yarns with different chevron motifs.
So how do you get your hands on this wonder to behold? The Chevron Collection is available for download on Ravelry. Or you can enter for the free giveaway!

Frank C. Gage, PFC
For the contest, let's fully celebrate Memorial Day in the spirit in which it was created. To qualify for this free giveaway, leave a comment with the name of someone who served in the military whom you would hold in your heart this weekend.

I will start. I remember my grandfather, Frank C. Gage, Private First Class, 53rd Artillery CAC. He served in World War I and lived in northeastern Indiana his entire life. I never knew him; he died when my mother was a child. But I remember him regardless and thank him for his service to my country.

Now let's hear about who you remember. No worry if you don't know his or her unit. Just let us remember your loved one with you this weekend. Enter a comment below - and be registered for the give-away, too.

And on Monday, I'll pick someone at random and announce the winner.

Happy Memorial Day!

52 comments:

  1. Motivated by a desire for Miriam Felton's e-book AND by missing my father, I'll go first.

    My father, Gerard Hebert, grew up in Maine. As soon as he graduated from high school he enlisted in the U.S. Navy, and served the last few years of WWII in the Pacific theater in the submarine service. He wouldn't talk about it when I was young, but in his later years he showed his pride. My husband helped him to get the service medals he was entitled to, and he treasured them.

    I'm thankful to him and to all that serve. Dad, thanks for everything!

    Linda in New York

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a beautiful story about your grandfather Julie, thank you for sharing! I have SO many reasons to be Proud and Thankful this weekend! I am both an Army wife and daughter! All of my father's brother's served in different branches of the military, along with my grandfathers on both sides, numerous cousins and various relatives from distant generations! My biggest reason to be grateful this weekend...ALL of them served their country Proudly and came home Safely!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well, I'm not from the US and my family is Mennonite so none of them have ever served in the Canadian military, but I do have a very close friend down in the States, his name is Andrew Weed. He's part of the medical unit down in Indiana (I think in Indiana). He completed basic almost 2 years ago but I am very, very thankful that he hasn't been called into service or duty or whatever you call it.

    ReplyDelete
  4. My husband's uncles, all four of them, served in WWII. The only son who didn't serve was his Dad, because he was too young. He said that his Grandmother was a woman of intense prayer! I couldn't imagine having four out of five sons at war at the same time! Thankfully, they all made it through the war.
    My father was in the Army, stationed in Germany during the Korean Conflict.
    We are always thankful for those that serve our country.
    Lyndee in Southern California

    ReplyDelete
  5. I have to go waaaay back on this one! Little military service in my family--my late father could not serve during WWII because of a serious accident while he was a small child, so I am going back to my Great Great Grandfather Oliver B. Cone who fought during the Civil War--yowey!! He was shot in the back during the Battle of Pea Ridge--I think I have that correct--in Arkansas. He was honorably discharged. He was from Iowa, but I don't know anything else. I have a neat photograph of him in his uniform.
    Barb T.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Great idea to combine the book giveaway with a salute to veterans.

    My dad, Ernest Tucker, was flight mechanic on a B-24 bomber, stationed in England during WWII, 392nd Bomb Group. His plane was "Mairzy Doats" (which was also the title of a novelty song of the era).

    --Lynda in Oregon

    ReplyDelete
  7. Love both the giveaway and the memorial... my father served on a flight deck in the South Pacific during World War II and was buried at Fort Rosecrans in January. He was my hero!

    -Glenda in San Diego

    ReplyDelete
  8. My Dad had four brothers and three sisters. Three of his brothers fought in World War II. My father had polio twice as a kid so he wasn't eligible to join the service. He helped the war effort by working at the Charlestown Navy Yard, building ships during the war. His fourth brother was too young. My Dad always reminded us how fortunate we are to live in the USA, how important it is to vote and to give thanks to those who put their lives on the line to fight for our freedom.

    Thank you
    Kay - Everett MA

    ReplyDelete
  9. Those I know in a close way who served are Vets.
    However, this weekend I will remember in a special spiritual way Marist Fr. Robert Brett who was killed while serving his fellow servicemen in Viet Nam.May he rest in peace.
    t

    ReplyDelete
  10. I will fondly remember my dear father-in-law. He was a very gracious man and served in WWII. He worked with the medical team getting the wounded soldiers away from the action.

    I will also be remembering my mother who lived and survived in France during the Nazi occupation.

    ReplyDelete
  11. My dad, Alfred Varrecchione, of Rhode Island, was in the army during World War II. His brother, Dominic, was also there. They only saw each other once in 4 years and that was while they each road in the back of a truck which was driving in opposite directions.

    I thank all our military - active, retired, or departed - for their courage and willingness to fight to keep our country free and safe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So funny I was looking through archives of my family and stumbled upon this blog. My grandfather was Dominic Varrecchione so you must be my great aunt?

      sherri

      Delete
  12. I got a lump in my throat and tears in my eyes when you asked us to remember someone dear to us who was in service.

    The answer was both easy and terribly painful for me: Sgt. Scott Lange Kirkpatrick, a young man who was a gifted writer and a renaissance thinker. I was a friend and mentor to him for six years in the DC Poetry Slam ... I met him when he was sixteen. Scott was caring, smart, funny, satirical, sharp and compassionate all at the same time.

    I miss him EVERY DAY. If you ever visit Arlington National Cemetery, please visit Scott's grave, and whisper a thank-you to this valiant young man with a courageous heart and a poet's eye.

    Nicki

    ReplyDelete
  13. My brother in law, Clint Galloway. He's serving right now in Afghanistan. My sister just had their first baby in February. My new nephew is beautiful, but Clint only got to spend 3 weeks with him before deployment. I have so much respect for him.

    ReplyDelete
  14. My father, Clair Wrights, was a radio man in a B-17 bomber stationed in New Guinea during WW2. He was wounded, received a Purple Heart, and was sent home near the end of the war. Five of his brothers also served making my grandmother a Mom with six sons to worry about during the fighting. My Mother's brother Charles Dickey was stationed in England and worked in the financial department of the Army. He was not allowed in combat because of poor eyesight and he was too short to be the paratrooper he wished to be. He was one of the first people into Hitler's bunker after the surrender. There is a newspaper article showing him with a strongbox of money that the Germans had been hoarding.
    The people, men and women who serve in the military to protect our country have my highest appreciation and respect.

    ReplyDelete
  15. When I read you post, I had so many people come to mind, my grandfather, Harry Robbins PFC and POW in WWII; my great-uncle Casper Bromley, WWII; my father-in-law Paul Snizek, US Army, Korea; my dear friend's father Rip Cain, US Navy, Viet Nam; and my brother-in-law Warren Blazer, US Navy. I also thought of my nephews currently serving; Sean, US Army, Richard USMC; and my niece Tiffany who will be joining the Army after graduation next spring.

    And all to of the men and women currently serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, thank you for your service and dedication!

    ReplyDelete
  16. I remember my borther John, who served in the Air Force as an radar technician, my brother Don who was in the Army, and my Uncle Gene, who was in the Army. I'm very grateful to those who keep us safe.

    ReplyDelete
  17. My grandfather served in both the World Wars, and was really proud of his service record, as is his family. He was a soldier in WWI, and helped to train soldiers in WWII. One of my favorite pictures of him was taken while he was wearing his uniform, and I've got one of his badges in my family album.

    I'm sure every family has a story to share this weekend, so let's encourage them to keep the memories alive by sharing them with others.

    ReplyDelete
  18. My grandfather, who I never met and know very little about. I know he was Army and served in France in WWII, and helped with reconstruction, but that's about it. I heard a few stories about him growing up, and we seem to share the love of a good book and an *insanely* strong cup of coffee. Wherever he is now, I hope he's enjoying a mug and a great yarn. :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I hope this doesn't post twice.

    My grandfather, enlisted in the Navy and made it all the way to fighting in France before it was discovered that he was too young. He was sent home, he later reenlisted and served in the Navy for several years. I was young and uninterested in his stories, but I know he was a member of the VFW and DAV and they did the military bit at his funeral. I wish I would have listed more and could help pass on his story.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I am grateful for my father. He was a cook in the Army and served in Korea during the "police action." He really wanted to be in communications and also be with his younger brother. However, he made the mistake of serving a fabulous meal to the colonel who approved these things. Not only was his transfer denied, but he had to give the colonel's own cook a lesson on how to prepare these canned sides of corned beef the military in Korea used to get. He told me once that had he not tangled with a superior officer stateside, he probably would have re-enlisted and stayed in the Army. And then he wouldn't have met my mom!

    Thanks, dad.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Although my father served in the Army during WW2, I would like to name my brother Michael, who served in the Navy in Da Nang, during the Vietnam war. We have not spoken in a long time, but I still hold him in my heart.

    ReplyDelete
  22. I am remembering a young man of 21 at our church who was killed by a roadside bomb not 4 months ago. He was a special light extinguished too soon! God Bless them all!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Chris from Stourbridge, UKMay 28, 2011 at 4:56 AM

    I'm in the UK and although we don't celebrate Memorial Day, I want to tell you about my wonderful father. He joined the Royal Navy as a cadet, aged just 16, and signed on for 12 years. He was just about to be demobbed when war broke out and he served another 6 years. He and Mum were waiting until he left the navy before they married, but when war broke out, they married in 1940. Dad always said that Hitler didn't have a bullet for him, and he was right! I'll always be grateful to his patience as he taught me to knit, when I was just 3 years old, and it's given me a lifetime of pleasure.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Remembering my grandfather, Joseph Paul Walker, who served during World War II.

    ReplyDelete
  25. I'm really proud of baby brother. He served 20 years in the US Navy. He retired a couple of years ago but still works with the Navy as a private contractor. He was the first one in our family to serve in the military as my father was an immigrant to the US after WW2. He always claimed he wanted to go to Annapolis and join the Navy for some male bonding since he was the youngest of 5 children and the only boy! He got his wish! Way, way, way back, my ancestor Lt. Daniel Collins served in the Connecticut branch of the Revolutionary Army and fought in several New England battles, and another ancestor (US Grant) commmanded the Union Army during the Civil War.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Deborah Peterson, RAV: oldmanwoolfarmMay 28, 2011 at 8:32 AM

    I remember my great-uncle Wally. He served in WW2 because his brother was married and had to work the farm. Wally was a very generous and kind man. From what I've been told, he came back refusing to talk about what he had seen in the war, only later in years would he begin to talk about it.

    ReplyDelete
  27. My dad served in the Korean War as an Airflight Surgeon. He passed away 15 years ago and recently I asked my mother what he did in the Air Force. She said he was not allowed to tell her so she just watched him leave and come back. Just like many of the families today.

    While we salute the people who served our country, I also salute all the families back home who have to go about their routines with the anxiety in their hearts.

    ReplyDelete
  28. My dad passed this last February. He served in the US Air Force for twenty eight years. Dad served many of those years as a load master.

    Now his grandson, my son Dylan, serves in the Army.

    ReplyDelete
  29. what a super giveaway..id have to say my great grandfather..clarence allen who served in the army..i just dont know what his rank was..happy memorial day!! raineoc@yahoo.com

    ReplyDelete
  30. What a lovely idea Julie, I'm thinking of my Maternal Grandfather, Philip Reid, who bravely served in Europe during WW2 and was badly burnt at Montecasino. A quiet, modest, intelligent and much missed Grandfather. He used to walk me to school whenever they stayed with us and I often asked him about the war but he wouldn't ever discuss it, saying it was too horrible to contemplate.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I'm thinking of my dear friend Harold. He was about 6'4" and probably 150 lbs soaking wet. He always had a good sense of humor about his thin frame because he said the only time he knew being skinny was a blessing was when the Germans were shooting at him as he crossed a river on foot. He said he could actually feel bullets fly between his legs! I also remember when the movie "Saving Private Ryan" was released. He asked my husband to take him to the movie. My husband warned, "Harold, I don't know. Vets have been advised to not see the movie because many of them have nightmares after seeing the movie." Harold just shurgged and said, "So what, I have nightmares about WWII every night." He always tried to smile in the face of his pain. Scambugger on Ravelry.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I'm having troubles getting this comment posted-- thinking of two friends presently serving in the army and sending good thoughts their way on this Memorial Day Weekend.
    Miriam's patterns are so soothing to work on and so soulful to wear. Many thanks.
    ditetre(at)mac(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
  33. Memorial Day is for memories of my Dad. Not only did he serve in the navy in WWII but as a scoutmaster and later a member of Jewish War Veterans he marched in Memorial Day parades where ever we lived. He took his patriotism seriously. Thanks dad! He passed away 8 yrs ago just before d-day anniversary.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Susan
    I have lots of reasons. My father served in the Royal Canadian Air Force in WWII. His brother served in the US Navy. My mother's brother served in the Marines in the Korean Conflict. My husband served in the US Army at the end of Viet Nam and into peace time. I also served in the US Army as a linguist. I have also worked at the VA hospital as a Nurse Practitioner serving our veterans.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Lovely idea. My mother, Capt. Helen M.P. Krystopik USANC, was a US Army nurse in the European theater during WWII. That's where she met my father, an infantry officer badly wounded on D-Day. Mom was forced to resign when I was born - no dependents under 18 for female officers in those days. She now resides at Arlington National Cemetery. Mom is only one of many veterans among out family & friends. Thank you all.

    ReplyDelete
  36. this memorial day I am thinking about my father in law..He served during the Korean War.

    My mother in law passed away recently and he is so lost and lonely. It brought back memories to him of all the friends he lost in battle. Just breaks my heart.

    ReplyDelete
  37. My uncles: Carlos, Cheo, and Raymond. All of them served together during the Vietnam War. Since I've known them (I was born in 82), they've all had their odd quirks and behaviors. I never knew it was due to trauma they witnessed in Vietnam until I was older. They sacrificed then and they sacrifice now.

    ReplyDelete
  38. My dad was the first to serve in the army during ww II.. I had several cousins who served in Vietnam. My husband served for 18 years in the Army before retiring. He was in Panama for Just cause and then after moving us from VA ti TX immediately headed to Saudi for desert shield/storm. each generation scarficed for the future ones

    ReplyDelete
  39. My father-in-law, Everette N. Bean, served in the army as a guard during the Nuremburg trials. My father, Isaac M. Hamilton flew a P-51 Mustang in the Korean war and also did a tour of duty in Thailand. I miss them both!

    Anne Bean

    ReplyDelete
  40. This weekend I will be honoring David Kloote who served as a Marine in the Vietnam War. He was injured physically and emotionally serving our country and he still carries the emotional and physical scars today. I can't say Thank you enough for all that our service men and women have done for us.

    ReplyDelete
  41. My grandfather was a member of the RAF and stationed in Africa during WWII. The youngest of five brothers, he was the only one married and had two toddler twin boys when he was drafted. I remember my Dad telling me how upset his brothers were that they were too old to enlist. They all did their part, of course, the oldest brother being a vet from WWI, but we forget about those aged out between the wars. Of course, I salute my Grandfather and all those who have served their country. But I also salute all the families left behind; their contributions are equally as dear. My father often talks about being evacuated from London to Ireland during the war. It's an indelible part of his memory that's contributed to the fabric of my own life and loves.

    ReplyDelete
  42. My father was in WWII. He wouldn't say much about it, just that the Danube sure as heck wasn't blue when he saw it, and his draft notice said that his "friends and neighbors were inviting him to serve". He said " and I thought that they liked me". He had a Purple Heart and a Bronze Star, would not talk about them. I learned how he earned them after he died in 1987.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Much as I hate to say it, I have to honor my first husband, going to Viet Nam when our son was only two weeks old. Times have changed so much, a woman at work talks on the phone to her son in Afghanistan all the time. In the early 70's, it was snail mail all the way. He never did talk about it much afterwards, but he was changed by the experience. Hard hard times for everyone in America.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I am remembering my father, Cliff who served in the Army Air Corps in a B-29 bomber during WW2, my father-in-law, Dahlen, who served in the Army Tank Corps in WW2 and my only child, son, Jesse, who is now in the Army Ranger Regiment about to be deployed to Afghanistan again. Thanks to the wonderful men in my life that sacrificed to save our wonderful country. SDSue on Ravelry.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Wow, so many wonderful stories of courage! I'm from New Zealand and we honour our armed forces on ANZAC Day in April. I especially remember my grandfather, Bertram (Bert) Hey, who fought in Europe during WWI. He never spoke of his time overseas, like most of his fellow soldiers, but he had been "mentioned in dispatches" (I understand this is not far removed from a Victoria Cross) twice for his bravery. Once, at least, for saving his commanding officer under enemy fire.

    In more recent years, my husband's brother served in the NZ Army during the Vietnam war. My husband had tried to enlist as well, but was rejected because of physical reasons.

    ReplyDelete
  46. My grandfather who pasted away 10 yrs ago. He served in WWII with the Army. My other grandfather also in WWII. I'm also holding my hubby in my heart he is Navy (active duty), currently deployed on USS Ronad Reagan.
    shuttermom77 @ gmail (dot) com

    ReplyDelete
  47. My great grandfather and my grandfather served in WWI and WWII respectively. I barely knew my grandfather but both of these men meant the world to my mother.

    ReplyDelete
  48. My dad was in the Army Air Corps in WWII in the Pacific. My late husband was in the US Army in Vietnam and died 8 years ago from complications from being exposed to Agent Orange. My daughter is currently in the Oregon Air National Guard. And her father also served in Vietnam. My grandfather served in the Army in WWI and I had an uncle who served in Korea.

    ReplyDelete
  49. My dad and uncles all served in WW II, and my son-in-law now serves with great dignity in the Navy. But the one person that has to hold a special place in my heart is Lt. Michael Murphy, Navy SEAL, who was awarded the congressional Medal of Honor. He sacrificed his life in an attempt to save his men during Operation Redwing. He was a good friend to my daughter, and even in death he looked after her. They spent many summers lifeguarding, and after his death, she made an attempt to honor him by attending a number of memorial services and dedications in his honor. It was at one of these services she met one of Michael's good friends that he served with. They dated, fell in love, and married (with a picture of Michael tucked into the pocket of the groom's suit at the wedding). Now they have a healthy little boy, my grandson :) To this day, I cannot help but feel that Michael is still looking after them, and continues to bring us joy.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Remembering my papaw Bernard Henry Methvin who served in the Marine Corp during WWII. I don't know any detail past that as he could never bear to talk about them.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Still with us (thank goodness) are my Dad (20 year Navy man) and my Nephew (3 Army tours to the mideast). Their day is Veteran's Day.
    But on this Memorial day I remember and/or honor:
    My FIL (who I never met) who served in WWII and landed on the beaches on DDay. My husband says he never talked aout it... wouldn't talk about it to the day he died.
    My great uncle, a Navy pilot lost in WWII.
    My Great Grandfather who fought in the Civil War (and was wounded at Gettysburg).
    And my Great Great Grandfather, serving in the Navy in the times of the Tall Ships, he fought in the Spanish American War.

    ReplyDelete